Thursday, October 25, 2007

My Knit Stitch

Being in the midst of miles and miles of stocking stitch has come to bore me. I know this is why the Rowena has been put away for so long. I knew there were 2 sleeves, and an endless number of knit and purl stitches waiting for me so I hid it away. In an effort to keep me entertained, I have been trying to closer investigate my actual process of completing a knit stitch and a purl stitch.



I have come to one major conclusion - I produce a very odd looking stocking stitch.


Take a look at the left side of each "v" of the stitch - it appears to be quite tight, while the right side looks very loose (or normal). It's hard to take a picture of very small stitches - hopefully you get the picture.

Upon closer examination, I think it's because I pull my right needle at the end of each stitch. Not intentionally, but I do it.
Any thoughts on this? Why I might be doing it or how to fix it? It doesn't bother me too much, but it'll be interesting to hear what people think.
Tomorrow, we'll closely examine my purls...and I got me some good purls....

5 comments:

andi said...

I'm with you. Stocking stitch bores the ever loving crap out of me - but I have no suggestions for how to fix yours.

catknip said...

I think its uniquely intriguing and rather lovely in an obtuse way. Kinda like you ...

T. said...

Thank you - I take that as a complement!

J. said...

I myself do a weird, lopsided stocking stitch but it evens out with blocking so i don't worry about it.

Karla (ThreadBndr) said...

What J said - I've noticed the same thing in my knitting - it seems more obvious in my case when knitting stocking st in the round.
But looking at my finished and blocked projects, I can't see it at all.

I think what is happening is that I tug just a bit on the 'trailing' side of the stitch when I throw the yarn over in the next stitch. There's just enough difference in the tension to show. But getting the wool wet allows the two sides of the stitch to 'even out' and find a tension for both sides that's halfway between the 'on the needle' tension for each side.